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Noble Gas



Noble gases reside on the far right column of a traditional periodic table. In the periodic table there are only six noble gases which are located in the group 18 or 8a. <Ref> Bentor, Y. (2006) Periodic Table: Noble Gases. Retrieved January 21, 2009, from http://www.chemicalelements.com/groups/noblegases.html</ref> The noble gases group is made up of the elements helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon, and radon. During the 1960's the Noble gases were thought to be inert, which means to be non-reactive. <Ref> Bentor, Y. (2006) Periodic Table: Noble Gases. Retrieved January 21, 2009, from http://www.chemicalelements.com/groups/noblegases.html</ref> The oxidation number for these gases is 0, which keeps them from making compounds. <Ref> Bentor, Y. (2006) Periodic Table: Noble Gases. Retrieved January 21, 2009, from http://www.chemicalelements.com/groups/noblegases.html</ref> The outer shell of the noble gases is full which keeps the gases stable and they tend to neither gain nor lose electrons. Their ionization energies are high and their electronegative levels are not really significant. <Ref> Helmenstein, A. Noble Gases. Retrieved January 21, 2009, from http://chemistry.about.com/od/elementgroups/a/noblegases.htm</ref> The gases have low boiling points and they all are gases at room temperature. <Ref> Helmenstein, A. Noble Gases. Retrieved January 21, 2009, from http://chemistry.about.com/od/elementgroups/a/noblegases.htm</ref>


Helium

Main article: Helium

Helium is the second element in the periodic table.Helium is one of the noble gases, it is also an unrealative, colorless, and odorless monatomic gas. The symbol for Helium is He, and is pronounced as HEE-lee-em. <Ref> Steve Gagnon. Retrieved February 5, 2009. http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele002.html</Ref> , and the atomic mass is 4,0026 g/mol. When added to water helium becomes less soluble than any other gas. The density and viscosity of helium vapors are lower than others, and the boiling point is lower but weighs more than others as well. There are many uses for helium among us, a few being filling balloons, making neon lasers, leak detectors, and helping flotation devices stay afloat.

Neon

Main article: Neon

Neon is a noble gas discovered by Sir William Ramsay, a Scottish chemist, in 1898. [1] with the help of his student, an English chemist, named Morris W. Travers. Ramsay discovered the element Neon when he chilled a bit of the atmosphere. He did this until it liquefied, then he began to warm up the liquid until it became a gas. From that gas he realized there were actually three gases, they were krypton, xenon, and Neon. After that the French engineer Georges Claude made a lamp from an electrified tube of the Neon gas in 1910. By 1915, Claude was selling his Neon light tubes to many U.S. companies.


Argon

Main article: Argon

Argon was suspected by Henry Cavendish in 1785 but wasn't discovered until 1894 by Sir William Ramsay. <Ref> Bentor, Y. Argon. Retrieved January 21, 2009, from http://www.chemicalelements.com/elements/ar.html</ref> The element symbol for argon is Ar and the gas was produced by factorization of liquid air. <ref name="UC"> University of California.(2003). Argon. Retrieved January 21, 2009, from http://periodic.lanl.gov/elements/18.html</ref> The element argon has the same solubility as oxygen. When argon is in the form of a gas and liquid it's colorless and odorless. It is also known as a non reactive gas and it can't form a true chemical compound. <ref name="UC" /> This element is used in electric light bulbs,fluorescent lighting, filling photo tubes, and glow tubes. It is also used as a shield when it is an inert gas.

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In 1783 Henry Cavendish was studying nitrous oxide. He began lighting mixtures of nitrogen and oxygen, when he noticed there was always a small bit of nonreactive gas left over. Cavendish later decided to leave it alone for future scientists. <Ref> Wilson,G.The History of Noble Gases. Retrieved January 21, 2009,from http://scienceweek.com/2005/sw051216-1.htm</ref> Then in 1894 Lord Rayleigh and Sir William Ramsay announced that they had discovered a new nonreactive chemical element called argon,"the lazy one". <ref> Wilson,G.The History of Noble Gases. Retrieved January 21, 2009,from http://scienceweek.com/2005/sw051216-1.htm</ref>


Krypton

Main article: Krypton

Krypton was discovered by Sir William Ramsay in 1898. <ref> University of California.(2003)Krypton. Retrieved January 21, 2009, from http://periodic.lanl.gov/elements/36.html</ref>The element symbol for Krypton is Kr. The name krypton comes from the Greek word krypton which means hidden.<ref>Bentor,Y.Krypton.Retrieved January 21, 2009, from http://periodic.lanl.gov/elements/36.html</ref> Krypton is from the production of air and can also makes bright lines of green and orange.<Ref>University of California.(2003)Krypton. Retrieved January 21, 2009, from http://periodic.lanl.gov/elements/36.html</ref>Krypton can be used in lamps, photographic flash cubes, stroboscopic lamps, and lighthouses. It also gives off a great amount of light when electricity passes through it.

Xenon

Main article: Xenon

Xenon is a noble gas.

The element xenon was discovered by Sir William Ramsay in 1898 when some residue of liquid air was left behind.<ref>University of California.(2003)Xenon.Retrieved January 21, 2009.From http://periodic.lanl.gov/elements/54.html</ref> The element symbol for Xenon is Xe. Xenon comes from the Greek word xenon which means stranger.<ref>Bentor.Y.Xenon.Retrieved January 21, 2009.From http://www.chemicalelements.com/elements/xe.html</ref> The element xenon is used for powerful lamps such as stroboscopic lamps and bactericidal lamps.<Ref>University of California.(2003)Xenon.Retrieved January 21, 2009.From http://periodic.lanl.gov/elements/54.html</ref> Its also used in nuclear fields for bubble chambers and when high molecular weight is used. The element xenon is not toxic but its compounds are because of their high oxidizing characteristics.<Ref>University of California.(2003)Xenon. Retrieved January 21, 2009.From http://periodic.lanl.gov/elements/54.html</ref>Xenon is five times denser than air.

Radon

Main article: Radon

Radon is colorless at standard temperature and pressure and it is the most dense gas known. It was first discovered by Frederich Ernest Dorn in 1900. Dorn reported some experiments in which he noticed that radium compounds emanate a radioactive gas he named Radium Emanation (Ra Em).[1]In 1910, Sir William Ramsay and Robert Whytlaw-Gray isolated radon, determined its density, and determined that it was the heaviest known gas. In 1923 this element was renamed radon. The element symbol for radon is Rn. The name radon came from radium. [2] Radon is used in hospitals for therapeutic reasons. Radon occurs in the environment mainly in the gaseous phase. Consequently, people are mainly exposed to radon through breathing air.They pump radium and seal it in needle but hospitals stopped doing this because they can purchase needles from suppliers.[3] The first major studies with radon and health occurred in the context of uranium mining in the Joachimsthal region of Bohemia.When handling radon people should be extremely careful because when inhaled it could cause health concerns or even death.[4]


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